Sex Education is the Show We Need in the #MeToo Era
Sex Education is the Show We Need in the #MeToo Era

The new Netflix show Sex Education might seem like just another teenage dramedy. It has a John Hughes-inspired soundtrack, features an awkward teenage virgin boy protagonist, and a wardrobe with an 80s nod, which the show’s warm lighting casts in a vintage-y, golden hue. But the strength of the show lies in its portrayal of gender, toxic masculinity, and sexuality.

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Anneloes JagerComment
The Man From Earth: How the Self is Constructed
The Man From Earth: How the Self is Constructed

The construction of the Self is historically situated and is a conscious re-creation of what Nietzsche calls our “second nature” making us “poets of our lives”. The focal point of The Man From Earth is John Oldman, a university professor who claims to be 14,000 years old and has stopped ageing after 35. He has met the Buddha, sailed with Christopher Columbus and been a dear friend of Van Gogh. How is such a Self constructed?

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TV Review: The Innocent Man
TV Review: The Innocent Man

Based on John Grisham’s only non-fiction book, Netflix’s The Innocent Man takes a close look at two murders that took place in the 80s in Ada, Oklahoma. Each murder case was closed when the police obtained guilty confessions, with four men receiving sentences varying from life in prison to the death penalty. What followed was an ongoing reevaluation of the justice system.

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Film Review: Bad Times at the El Royale
Film Review: Bad Times at the El Royale

Drew Goddard, director of The Cabin in the Woods, exhibits his exceptional brilliance in his new movie Bad Times at the El Royale. The movie checks of all the marks for the 1950s-60s movie style. Even though the plot is a bit predictable at times, the intriguing cinematography creates a new world for the viewers.

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BoJack Horseman: What Are You Doing Here?
BoJack Horseman: What Are You Doing Here?

When BoJack Horseman dropped its first season on Netflix it was noted for its quick paced humour featuring animal puns and linguistic dexterity. Soon though, it stood out from the crowd as a show that tackles in a direct and poignant way themes of depression, self-loathing, nihilism, and existential angst. How has it developed in the last four years to become one of the most successful animated shows around?

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God and Mammon Go to the Movies
God and Mammon Go to the Movies

The conflict between the competing demands of the market economy and religion is unmistakable in three much lauded films of the last decade, There Will Be BloodHail, Caesar!, and The Birth of a Nation, in which characters negotiate the underlying contradictions between a get-rich-quick economy and a money-is-the-root-of-all-evil faith.

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Film Review: I, Tonya
Film Review: I, Tonya

I, Tonya breathes new life into the biopic genre while telling the story of the most infamous figure skater of the 1990s, Tonya Harding. The film elaborately captures everything: her music taste, her outfits on the ice rink, and how she lived her life as the most hated and beloved skater in America and arguably worldwide.

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Film Review: Black Panther
Film Review: Black Panther

Black Panther ticks all the boxes of what a conventional superhero movie should be, but it is so much more than that. It is one of the most highly anticipated films of the year, and has already set a record for the highest advance sales of any Marvel movie.

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FilmAnneloes JagerComment
Film Review: Murder On The Orient Express
Film Review: Murder On The Orient Express

Murder on the Orient Express is based on one of Agatha Christie’s most popular detective novels. Even though a faithful adaptation, director Kenneth Branagh and screenwriter Michael Green have altered some of its characteristics to create a visually pleasing experience (which aims to make up for an 80-year-old plot twist). 

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Film Review: The Babysitter
Film Review: The Babysitter

The Babysitter was a pleasant surprise for October. The predictable lack of real substance was pushed out of focus by the very decent job that was done in creating a visually pleasing and fun movie. Nothing is taken to seriously, especially not the blood and death, and this lets The Babysitter get away with failing (or rather, not even trying) to reach the bar for Halloween movies.

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